FAA releases proposed drone laws

Atmel | Bits & Pieces


Newly-announced FAA rules might allow thousands of business drones in the next few years. 

Following latest reports of a leaked document, the FAA has announced the regulations that will allow routine use of small drones in the United States. Before becoming finalized, the rules must go through a comment period, during which the public will have an opportunity to weigh in on the rules. Those of you who may recall, back in 2012, Congress had required the FAA to create rules around the integration of small drones by 2015.

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Once the order is finalized, the Washington Post shares that the FAA estimates that more than 7,000 businesses will obtain drone permits within three years. Furthermore, based on the recently-revealed document, companies would not be permitted to fly drones over long distances which would effectively preclude expedited delivery efforts ranging from pizza makers to Amazon. The rules, however, are expected to be modified and loosened over the coming decade as drone technology advances…

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This Drone Can Save Lives And Fly Indoors Without Crashing Constantly – via Techcrunch

The cage is held in place by a multi-axis gimbal system (thus the “GimBall” name), allowing the cage to rotate and roll indepedently of the propeller/camera rig at its core.

gimball 3

Surrounding the GimBall’s drone core is a spherical cage which serves three purposes: letting it roll along the wall or ceiling, keeping the device’s propellers away from your skin, and absorbing shock to keep the device in the air.

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Amazon Asks FAA for Permission to Test Drones – via WSJ

amazon prime air

Amazon formally requested permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to start testing drones, an important step toward the online retail giant’s goal to use the devices to deliver packages.

Amazon first unveiled the plans in December, dubbing the proposed service Amazon Prime Air and saying drones would eventually be able to deliver small packages to customers in less than 30 minutes.

In its petition to the FAA, posted Thursday, Amazon said it is now on its eighth- and ninth-generation drone prototypes, including some that can travel more than 50 miles an hour and carry 5-pound packages, which would cover 86% of products it sells.

He added, “One day, seeing Amazon Prime Air will be as normal as seeing mail trucks on the road today.”

However, in a 2012 law, Congress gave the FAA the authority to grant expedited exemptions for some unmanned aircraft. […]  the agency was only considering exemptions for drones used for filmmaking, agriculture and inspections of infrastructure and energy plants.

In its request, Amazon says that it would limit its use of drones to “a confined area over isolated Amazon private property,” away from airports, densely populated areas and military installations.

The company argues that granting its request will allow it to “do nothing more than what thousands of hobbyists and manufacturers of model aircraft do every day,” a common argument of commercial-drone advocates.

There is other evidence that Amazon is serious about drone deliveries.

The company has at least six jobs posted on its careers website that are focused on developing Prime Air, including a project manager, a spokesman, a software engineer and a patent lawyer. All the jobs are in Seattle, except the software engineer, which is in San Francisco.

In some of the job descriptions, the company says, “You will work hard, have fun, and of course, make history!”

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The Next Frontier in Digital Media Will Be Connected Products – ADAGE

The “Internet of Things” (IoT) has recently exploded as a hot new “thing,” fueled in part by Google‘s and Cisco’s increasing strategic investments, and an estimated $19 trillion dollar market opportunity

internet of Things

While early adopters are now experimenting with creative ways to leverage IoT as a conduit for deeper audience engagement, IoT hasn’t reached critical mass yet; IoT discussions still live inside the walls of “digital innovation” and “new product development.”

At the crux of IoT discussions for digital media is a rather simple, yet entirely disruptive concept — that individual physical products can become their own media platform for brands. In other words, a connectable product (anything from a bicycle to a soda can that consumers can engage with via their smartphones) can act as its own media channel — operating alongside TV, mobile, magazines and other media channels — and tapping into consumer behavior to create an entirely new form of CRM through physical objects. This concept — products as interactive media — has vast implications for the media landscape.

As products become connected, the game changes completely for brands, shifting marketers’ strategy from the traditional push model to a more intelligent pull model. A connected product provides a brand with a direct, real-time interface and interaction point with the consumer. Instead of pushing content toward consumers at the best guesstimated time to catch their attention, brands can engage with consumers who are proactively opting in to receive content when they most need it and when they are most engaged with the brand’s product.

Data is the key to enriching the consumer’s experience

Marketing executives are just beginning to open their eyes to the limitless marketing opportunities enabled by IoT. There is still a world of innovation before us, and if the industry can embrace the disruptive idea that products can serve as their own digital media channels, we’re off to a great start.

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Dhl consegnerà le medicine con i droni. Google e Amazon battute – Il Sole 24 ORE

I “parcelcopeter”, i droni radiocomandati saranno utilizzati per la prima volta nel mondo in consegne di merci urgenti, in tempo reale

via Dhl consegnerà le medicine con i droni. Google e Amazon battute – Il Sole 24 ORE.