Credete che la “digitalizzazione” sia solo una moda passeggera?

Vi ricordate che poco più di 10 anni fa non esistevano gli smartphone, i tablet e le Apps?

Usavamo telefonini Nokia, BlackBerry o Motorola: società’ ormai pressoché scomparse dal mercato. Cosi come e’ avvenuto alle videoteche Blockbuster con l’avvento dei film in digitale.

Il futuro sara’ sempre più “distruttivo” rispetto agli attuali stili di vita e di conseguenza cambieranno ancora di piu’ le professioni richieste dal mercato del lavoro, cioe’ cosa dovranno sapere fare i nostri figli.

Che piaccia o no, bisogna abituarsi all’idea, prepararsi a viverla e munirsi (soprattutto i ragazzi) delle competenze necessarie per saper gestire una societa’ in veloce cambiamento per esserne attori/promotori e non esserne travolti!

http://www.archimedea.it/le-professioni-dei-nostri-figli/

Mobile Telco: is it time for CTRL+ALT+DEL?

Telefonia mobile, un utente su 2 vorrebbe Google, Apple o Facebook come gestore: «Insoddisfatti dell’attuale customer experience»

Secondo i consumatori, gli operatori tradizionali investono troppo poco nei canali digitali (siti web, app mobili e social media), e solo l’8% ritiene i negozi fisici indispensabili, dice un report di Capgemini Consulting. «Emerge una correlazione tra uso dei canali digitali, livello di soddifazione, e crescita del fatturato»

Il report di Capgemini Consulting: “Unlocking customer satisfaction: why digital holds the key for telcos

“… rivela che quasi la metà (44%) degli utenti mobili passerebbe a Google, Apple o Facebook, se questi colossi introducessero un servizio di comunicazione mobile, per la “miglior qualità del servizio” (48%) e per la “esperienza più personalizzata” (23%) che essi potrebbero garantire rispetto all’attuale gestore telefonico.

[…]

«Ciò che i consumatori si aspettano dai fornitori di servizi di telecomunicazioni è cambiato, ma molti operatori non sono ancora pienamente in grado di soddisfare le richieste, con conseguente calo del livello di customer satisfaction, spiega Eraldo Federici, Senior Vice President, Market Unit Head, TME & Large Accounts di Capgemini Italia, in un articolo su CorCom. «La lenta diffusione dei servizi digitali costituisce il cuore del problema, e questo è un pesante richiamo agli operatori affinché accelerino gli sforzi di trasformazione in un’ottica digitale o si tengano pronti a rischiare uno sconvolgimento a opera dei gestori solo digitali”

leggi articolo originale:

http://www.mobile4innovation.it/mobile-internet/telefonia-mobile-un-utente-su-2-vorrebbe-google-apple-o-facebook-come-gestore-insoddisfatti_43672152227.htm?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=1SU2USERSGOOGLEFB_17052016&utm_content=post_content

McKinsey: nel 2025 l’Internet of Things può valere l’11% dell’economia mondiale

McKinsey stima che da qui al 2025 il mercato globale dell’Internet of Things potrebbe valere dai 3.900 agli 11.100 miliardi di dollari all’anno. Nella migliore delle ipotesi, si parla dell’11% dell’intera economia mondiale. Ma per arrivare a questa migliore ipotesi occorre costruire contesti, tecnologie e modelli di business che, al di là dell’entusiasmo e delle aspettative con cui ora si guarda al fenomeno, lo trasformino in una solida realtà.

internet-things-mckinsey-150717100448_medium

http://www.mobile4innovation.it/internet-of-things/mckinsey-nel-2025-l-internet-of-things-puo-valere-l-11-dell-economia-mondiale_43672151971.htm

 

Digital hives: Creating a surge around change – via McKinsey

Digital hives: Creating a surge around change

Online communities are helping companies engage with employees to accelerate change.

 

New lessons are emerging for executives striving to harness the power of social media in the cause of wider employee participation. Clearly, there’s more to success than just investing heavily in the latest Enterprise 2.0 technology platforms.

Large-scale engagement of the workforce requires, first and foremost, a firm grasp of organizational culture and its social dynamics, a psychological understanding of what triggers new behavior, a determination by management to loosen if not relinquish its traditional top-down approach, and an ability to demonstrate how digital activities complement offline or other real-world events.

Four ways to drive change

Here we present four specific approaches to the creation of what we call digital “hives”—electronic hubs bristling with collective activity and designed to solve a particular problem or set of problems, to drive new habits, and to encourage organizational change (exhibit). Digital tools to facilitate networking and collaboration propel these “horizontal” cascades, which at their best can weave new patterns of engagement across geographic and other organizational boundaries. In this way, they make it possible to have new conversations around problem solving, unlock previously tacit knowledge, and speed up execution.

Digital hives facilitate a collective approach to problem solving

1. Engaging the workforce in better strategy

Best practice in the formulation of strategy and in organizational change has long been to craft a “story” at the top and then to cascade it through lower echelons of the organization. […] Employees on the shop or office floor often feel like passive recipients.

That’s beginning to change, though, thanks to social technologies.

There are still relatively few social strategy-development processes, but the tools are getting more powerful, and the scale and scope of such efforts are more impressive.

Using the “management hackathon” concept—an integrated multistage platform that allows participants to discuss ideas, express opinions, and contribute expertise collectively2 —a successful consumer-goods company recently involved its entire organization in an open-source strategy process.

This effort started with an organization-wide online discussion about risks to the company’s growth engine from higher input costs, stagnant industry growth, and a growing competitive threat from imitators to certain products and the business model. These risks then formed the basis for a bottom-up process that spawned over a thousand new strategic insights using a combination of in-person meetings and workshops as well as online channels.

2. Connecting silos with a social chain

One of the biggest organizational challenges is to break siloed behavior and get employees talking to one another and cooperating across intracompany boundaries.

One promising social-technology experiment we’ve observed is what we call the “social chain”: a digital platform that links everyone working in a particular value chain inside a company.

The social chain allows employees to work “out loud” online by sharing how they do things. It also encourages people who were previously isolated in part of the chain to identify areas where they depend on others and to tackle problems or bottlenecks collaboratively. Chain leaders can monitor these conversations and inject their own insights when appropriate.

 To push people into the hive, managers discouraged communication through meetings and e-mail.

3. Enlisting key customers to improve the proposition

Thanks to the power of social technologies, a company that mobilizes such people can solicit specific ideas for improving its customer proposition and demonstrate its client-centricity more broadly.[…]

Or a company might create social “mystery shoppers” who follow internal conversations anonymously and comment on them.

4. Uniting a dispersed sales force to drive higher sales

These reps traditionally had spent several weeks at a time on the road, rarely checking in with the head office and therefore operating in a feedback and knowledge vacuum. Inevitably, they had become disconnected from the organization, and performance suffered.

Staff at the center collected ideas based on intelligence gleaned from the calls and e-mails of the sales reps themselves and from district managers familiar with current issues in the beverage trade. The company also analyzed customer data highlighting pockets of fiercer-than-normal competition or SKUs that were selling particularly well. Such insights were then shared with reps and agents, who each received two or three personalized SMS messages a day. Managers could further use this rudimentary social platform to communicate with the sales force by, for example, congratulating teams when they hit milestones and generally celebrating success. The company also created a call-center “leaderboard” allowing executives to track the agents most responsive to the new information at their disposal. The executives then freed up time for these “early adopters” to coach their peers, provide feedback, and strengthen the system with additional insights.

A new mind-set for senior managers

Leading while letting go

Creating these hives requires a delicate balancing act—not least a willingness by top managers to let go. Managers should not be afraid to commit themselves explicitly to acting on the results of these initiatives and should encourage unrestrained participation, however unpredictable the consequences.

Looking inward

The growing use of social tools to drive employee engagement provides particular opportunities for senior executives to improve role modeling. When people reflect on their behavior, they tend to rely on their own often sketchy perceptions and faulty memories. With many digital technologies, however, people can now track their behavioral footprint—for example, by analyzing conversational threads in microblogs .

Becoming more responsive

Mobilizing a crowd requires companies to anticipate the crowd’s expectations. Executives can maintain pace and encourage deeper engagement only through transparent feedback and rapid follow-up.

Unleashing collective intelligence through a hive will be more successful if managers think ahead and develop an agile, scrum-like response capability outpacing that of smaller offline programs.

Read full article here

Continue reading Digital hives: Creating a surge around change – via McKinsey

How the Internet of Things is affecting urban design – via Mashable

toyota3

An overwhelming range of possibilities

The impacts of the Internet of Things on our cities don’t begin and end with urban buildings — everything from the morning commute to public parks are incorporating Internet of Things technologies. Continue reading How the Internet of Things is affecting urban design – via Mashable

Watch out Telcos! Google confirms it wants to be a wireless carrier – via Mashable

Following nearly a year of rumors, Google confirmed on Monday that it plans to offer talk and data plans to customers. Sundar Pichai, senior VP at Google, said on stage at Mobile World Congress during a presentation that the company is working on a wireless service on a “small scale.”

[…]

Google is also getting closer to officially launching its solar-powered drone program Project Titan and will send its first fleet into the sky sometime this year.

[…]

Project Loon, which involves sending balloons into the sky to serve as floating cell towers to distribute Internet access across a large area.

read more

Google’s Project Ara pilot will be launched in Puerto Rico later this year

Another great innovation which will revolutionize the traditional concept of the “Mobile Phone”.

Before 2007 the Mobile phone was static: its features embedded by manufacturers and few software capabilities upgraded  on yearly basis!

Then the revolution of the Apps world made services provided by smartphone fully dynamic and fitting at any time any user needs with just a click : “There is even an app for that”!, so they say.

Now, the only part of the Smartphone which was supposed to stay the same for entire smartphone’s lifetime, the hardware, is going to be replaceable, configurable at any time … soon we may say “There even a module for that!”

Google’s Project Ara phone looks like it could be REALLY customizable.

More here: http://tnw.me/Q9lM4AZ

The digital enterprise – via McKinsey&Company

digital enterprise

Digital business models have become essential for companies across a range of industries. With social networks and e-commerce websites setting new benchmarks for speed, agility, and user-friendliness, consumers expect similar online performance from banks, retailers, and telecommunications companies.

Attackers born in the digital age give consumers what they want, but many older companies struggle to meet customer expectations. For them, going digital is now a prerequisite for surviving and thriving.

Success requires strong capabilities in four areas.

Read full article here

Continue reading The digital enterprise – via McKinsey&Company

Amazon Asks FAA for Permission to Test Drones – via WSJ

amazon prime air

Amazon formally requested permission from the Federal Aviation Administration to start testing drones, an important step toward the online retail giant’s goal to use the devices to deliver packages.

Amazon first unveiled the plans in December, dubbing the proposed service Amazon Prime Air and saying drones would eventually be able to deliver small packages to customers in less than 30 minutes.

In its petition to the FAA, posted Thursday, Amazon said it is now on its eighth- and ninth-generation drone prototypes, including some that can travel more than 50 miles an hour and carry 5-pound packages, which would cover 86% of products it sells.

He added, “One day, seeing Amazon Prime Air will be as normal as seeing mail trucks on the road today.”

However, in a 2012 law, Congress gave the FAA the authority to grant expedited exemptions for some unmanned aircraft. […]  the agency was only considering exemptions for drones used for filmmaking, agriculture and inspections of infrastructure and energy plants.

In its request, Amazon says that it would limit its use of drones to “a confined area over isolated Amazon private property,” away from airports, densely populated areas and military installations.

The company argues that granting its request will allow it to “do nothing more than what thousands of hobbyists and manufacturers of model aircraft do every day,” a common argument of commercial-drone advocates.

There is other evidence that Amazon is serious about drone deliveries.

The company has at least six jobs posted on its careers website that are focused on developing Prime Air, including a project manager, a spokesman, a software engineer and a patent lawyer. All the jobs are in Seattle, except the software engineer, which is in San Francisco.

In some of the job descriptions, the company says, “You will work hard, have fun, and of course, make history!”

read more

L’economia di #internet raddoppierà entro il 2016 – via IlSole24Ore

rete-internet-economia

Entro il 2016 il valore di internet raddoppierà rispetto al 2010, quando valeva il 3,4% del Pil: più di settori come l’agricoltura e l’energia.

Lo rivela lo studio «The Hyperconnected Economy», condotto dall’Economist Intelligence Unit (Eiu) e promosso da Sap, dedicato all’impatto di Internet e della iper-connettività sull’economia globale.

L’iper-connettività crescerà in modo esponenziale, con il numero di oggetti connessi che aumenterà di 30 volte entro il 2020, escludendo Pc, tablet e smartphone (fonte: Gartner).

L’iper-connettività sta indubbiamente accelerando fenomeni di globalizzazione e allo stesso tempo promuovendo il ritorno della produzione industriale nei paesi sviluppati in seguito alla necessità di disporre di personale altamente qualificato.

Sta, infine, contribuendo alla creazione delle cosiddette “micro-multinazionali” – piccole aziende con capacità di raggiungere e service clienti in tutto il mondo.

Leggi di piu’